COURSE CONCLUSION

Module 7

One of the largest challenges currently facing global cities is transforming them into smart cities. 

A smart city is intended to achieve higher standards for safety, cleanliness, and efficiency, while accommodating urban growth.

 Assembling the components is a challenge well-suited for service designers. They have the know-how, with experience using models, tools and techniques for integrating human behavior into the technologies required for automating the services cities provide. Those outcomes involve tying together Information and Communications Technology (ICT), with physical devices using the Internet of Things (IoT) network, and with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for real-time mapping and positioning.

Granted, there are other specialties, say, Human Systems Integration that support systems development. But only service design takes a comprehensive user-centric approach whose primary purpose is to design services around the user. The service designer’s focus is on outcome while designing a solution based on satisfying user needs.

The Vision for a Smart City

“What do Singapore, Dubai, Milton Keynes, London, Southampton, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Madrid, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and New York City all have in common? They are all becoming smart cities.” Chief strategy officer for Parkafon, David Pickerall, a smart city mobility consulting.

Singapore and Dubai are the most advanced toward becoming a smart city, he said. Other cities with inter-connected ambition include Milton Keynes, London and Southampton in the UK, and Amsterdam, Barcelona, Madrid, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and New York City.

What’s holding them back are issues tied to design and funding.  IBM, Siemens, Cisco and Ford have embarked on resarch and service design to create smart city offerings, much of them services.

INTER-CONNECTIVITY

• Connecting a smart city requires a strong wireless network. This will be provided by cells the size of shoe boxes. And they will be located on street lights, antennas, and on buildings.

• Connecting a smart city requires a strong wireless network. This will be provided by cells the size of shoe boxes. And they will be located on street lights, antennas, and on buildings.

• The inter-connections will provide real-time detection, analysis and reporting to tap any number of public services.

• The technology will operate lighting, monitor and regulate energy, operate traffic controls, and initiate faster emergency responses.

• Some of the overarching benefits include higher energy-efficiency, environmental monitoring and response, and better, reliable and accessible high speed.

UTILITIES

Energy

• Produced closer to where consumers live, thereby reducing dependence on storage capacity

.• Produced closer to where consumers live, thereby reducing dependence on storage capacity.• More affordable and environmentally friendly energy supply, largely due to more efficient solar and wind technologies.

• Also, automation systems that will make setting adjustments for optimum lighting, air ventilation and interior air quality.

Water, Wastewater, Garbage and Recycling

• Smart technology will help improve how wastewater is collected and separated, lowering energy costs and improving recycling.

• Smart technology will help improve how wastewater is collected and separated, lowering energy costs and improving recycling.

• Garbage trucks will be more efficient, and their routes better aligned to minimize energy and maximize capacity.

• Real-time water and wastewater usage monitoring will help quickly detect leaks and stoppages for faster remedies.

• Drinking water will be safer to drink through automated controls, even as populations grow and existing facilities reach present day capacity.

• What’s more, the use of technologies will promote better water and wastewater system maintenance, which will lowering users’ cost for processing and distribution.

Transportation

• Fewer drivers will encounter traffic congestion.

• Transportation systems will monitor traffic and control signaling, plus communicate alternative routes to drivers and self-driving vehicles.

• Self-driving cars, also known as semi and autonomous vehicles, will be used as shuttles. That will be an incentive to reduce vehicle ownership, a household cost savings of no less than $4,000 a year per vehicle.

• Drones, currently in use by some cities, will constantly roam overhead detecting and reporting traffic accidents.• All parking meters will be equipped with technology to broadcast availability.

It’s service designers who will help make Smart Cities a Success – and help solve some of the other most pressing global challenges.  Because service design builds services around users to meet their needs – as a user-centric design discipline.